May 31, 2015

“Why Should We Ask Users? Steve Jobs Didn’t!”

Posted in research tagged , , , , at 3:50 pm by mariawolters

In other words, if Apple designs beautiful hardware and software without “asking users what they would like”, we don’t need to ask users what they would like, either.

This way of thinking is a fallacy for two reasons.

Reason 1: It’s not about asking users what they would like, it’s about finding out what users need.

If you don’t give users what they actually need, but what you think they need, then in the best case, nobody buys your product, in the worst case, people die. (See my previous blog post on how a new system for ordering medications in a children’s Intensive Care Emergency Department led to more (entirely preventable) deaths.)

Finding out what users need is hard. You can’t do it by letting your imagination run wild; you need to go into the field, look at the context in which your solutions will be used, how people work right now, and how your proposed solutions might change the way people work for the better or for the worse.

Often, this also involves talking to people, that’s true. But when you talk to people, it’s not so much about what they think should be done, or about what they like or dislike. Rather, likes, dislikes, and suggested solutions are important clues to what users actually need.

Reason 2: You are not Steve Jobs, and neither are you Jony Ives or Tim Cook.1

Apple succeeds because they create tools that make some people’s lives better, and that give some people what they need. The genius of people like Ives and Jobs lies in their ability to discern what needs to be done – and then they work until they’ve got it right.

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1 I am assuming that the probability of the real Jony Ives or Tim Cook reading this post is close to zero.

May 29, 2015

Blogging ICPhS

Posted in research tagged , , , , at 2:18 pm by mariawolters

As those of you who follow me on Twitter or are Facebook friends with me, I’ve been part of the local programme committee of the International Congress of Phonetic sciences 2015 in Glasgow, and my role was to draft the oral programme, with steadfast support from Glasgow phonetician Rachel Smith.

In the following weeks, I will give you an insight into the way the programme was put together and explain some of the constraints we faced, the tools we used, and the decisions we made.

As ICPhS draws ever closer, I will start to highlight interesting sessions and feature phonetics bloggers and tweeters.

Kicking off, the next post (to be posted in two hours) is a plea for help from fellow Social Media junkies. If you have any comments, or ideas for what you would like to see featured in future posts, please leave a comment or tweet me (@mariawolters).

Active on Social Media? ICPhS Needs You!

Posted in icphs tagged , , , at 12:00 am by mariawolters

I swear – the first person to develop instantaneous human cloning will be a frustrated attendee of the International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS).

ICPhS is the biggest gathering in phonetics. Every four years, phoneticians and speech scientists from all over the world (except Antarctica) meet for five days of phonetics, phonetics, and yet more phonetics.

The programme is usually packed. This year alone, we will have fifteen time slots for oral presentations, with up to 8 parallel sessions. Around 380 papers will be presented orally, the same number as posters.

This year, we have a new feature, organised by Bert Remijsen and Pavel Iosad – ten discussant sessions, where eminent phoneticians pick four particularly interesting papers and discuss them in a thematic session. For reasons I will explain in a later post, these sessions are organised in two blocks of five parallel sessions.

All of this is a surefire recipe for many, many frustrated phoneticians. One way of mitigating at least some of the frustration is social media.

I know from ICPhS 2011 in Hong Kong that many people are already prepared to tweet the sessions they attend, but I wonder what we could do if we were a bit more organised this time around.

Specifically, I am wondering whether people would be happy to commit in advance to reporting specific sessions on social media. This could be through live tweets, a blog post, a LinkedIn entry, a Facebook summary, a MySpace song … you get the idea.

What do you think? Could you help?

May 17, 2015

The Craft of Usable eHealth

Posted in research tagged , , , at 6:19 pm by mariawolters

On the surface, usability is simple. “If the user can’t use it, then it doesn’t work at all”, as Susan Dray likes to say. But what does that mean in practice?

In health care, you have a large number of patients, a very small, finite number of health care practitioners, the cost of looking after these patients and providing them with the medications and therapy they need, and an empty purse.

And the demand for care is growing ever stronger. Thanks to the wonders of modern medicine, prevention, sanitation, and vaccinations, more people live longer, more people survive illnesses that would have otherwise killed them, and more people survive lifestyle choices that would have killed or crippled them fifty years ago.

eHealth promises to help. When the demand for skilled labour far outstrips its availability, technology can close the gap.

But eHealth technology will only work if people use it, and people will only use it if it works for them.

What does it mean for an eHealth system to be usable? In this post, I want to look at a somewhat iconoclastic discussion of the term usability by Gilbert Cockton, because it questions what I believe to be a dangerous myth in eHealth advocacy, the myth that people are the biggest barrier to successful implementation of telehealth.

They are not a barrier – they are the key.

Cockton summarises the standard view of usability thus:

  1. “Usability is an inherent measurable property of all interactive digital technologies

  2. Human-Computer Interaction researchers and Interaction Design professionals have developed evaluation methods that determine whether or not an interactive system or device is usable.

  3. Where a system or device is usable, usability evaluation methods also determine the extent of its usability, through the use of robust, objective and reliable metrics

  4. Evaluation methods and metrics are thoroughly documented in the Human-Computer Interaction research and practitioner literature. People wishing to develop expertise in usability measurement and evaluation can read about these methods, learn how to apply them, and become proficient in determining whether or not an interactive system or device is usable, and if so, to what extent.”

Vendors of eHealth systems who subscribe to this definition of usability will therefore (ideally) do the following:

A. Define a set of metrics that characterises the usability of their system

B. Conduct studies with all people who will use the system using appropriate methods in order to establish the usability of their system in terms of the specified metrics

The problem is that this is only the beginning. eHealth systems are used by people in specific contexts. Many of these contexts have features that cannot be foreseen by the original developers. People will adapt their use of those systems to the context and their own needs, a process that is known as appropriation in Human Computer Interaction.

Take for example a videoconferencing system that links people with their health care providers from the comfort of their own homes. The system has passed all objective and subjective metrics with flying colours, is easy to use, and has a mobile version, but requires a fast broadband connection.

User Jane McHipster lives on the waterfront in a loft with high ceilings. She has excellent broadband, so her GP can always see her clearly, but the sound is another matter. When the conversation turns to Jane’s mental health, the GP can barely hear her properly. But Jane is too ill to leave her house and come to the practice.

User June McHuckster, on the other hand, lives on a remote croft. Her Internet access comes through her smartphone contract, with the only provider who has good coverage of her home village. Her GPs used to call her regularly, but switched to the video system so they could see her, too. The picture quality is bad, and conversations often stop and start. June is so frustrated with the system that she will often tell the GP she’s fine just to cut the conversation short. This also leaves more of June’s limited broadband capacity for Skyping with her family, who live thousands of miles away.

Jim McSweeney is June’s next door neighbour. He also has family a thousand miles away, and the same smartphone contract. He has the same issues with conversations stopping and restarting, but for him, they don’t matter. He enjoys the banter with his GP when the connection breaks down yet again, loves being able to show instead of having to tell, and thanks the system for saving him from many a long and boring trip to the GP surgery.

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After thorough discussion of the literature on usability and usability evaluation, Cockton concludes in Section 15.5.3 that

  1. There are fundamental differences on the nature of usability, i.e., it is either an inherent property of interactive systems, or an emergent property of usage. There is no single definitive answer to what usability ‘is’. […]

  2. There are no universal measures of usability, and no fixed thresholds above or below which all interactive systems are or are not usable. […]

  3. Usability work is too complex and project-specific to admit generalisable methods. What are called ‘methods’ are more realistically ‘approaches’ that provide loose sets of resources that need to be adapted and configured on a project by project basis.”

Jane, June, and Jim have shown how usability emerges from the context in which the system is being used. In Jane’s case, the system works fine, but there are unexpected difficulties due to her living space. In June’s case, the system is hard to use, and it’s not worth it for her. In Jim’s case, the system is his salvation.

But if there is no one clear usability metric, then what are practitioners to do?

The first step is to genuinely listen to people’s concerns. Next steps and solutions will again vary by context.

For example, Jane could order a headset online, which would make her much easier to understand. June could shut off the video component of the consultation software, which consumes bandwidth and leads to most crashes, and only switch it back on again if the GP really needs to see her.

No rarely means never – in most cases, it means not specifically this, not right now, not right here. It is up to us to decipher it, and to design the interaction between human and eHealth system so we can get from no to yes.

The Promise and Perils of Computerised Prescription Systems

Posted in research tagged , , , , , , at 2:00 pm by mariawolters

ResearchBlogging.org

Prescribing medications to sick people is a difficult task. The person prescribing needs to choose the right medication, choose the right dose, choose the right timing for delivering those doses, and check whether the medication will interact with any other medications that the patient might already be on.

Clearly, computerised prescription order entry systems (or CPOE) systems have vast potential benefits here. Computers are much better than humans at storing masses of information. In principle, computer systems allow much faster and better access to all kinds of records, which means no more rustling through paper records distributed across several locations.

What’s more, CPOE also allows better stock management. Once medication has been ordered, the system knows exactly how much is needed, how much is still in stock, and can create valuable data sets that can be used to optimise stock management and anticipate demands.

CPOE also generates a data stream that can make it easy to audit prescription patterns and compare those patterns to best practice and evidence-based guidelines.

In short, CPOE is a win-win proposition, and if there is a module that fits with an existing medical record system, there’s no reason why it should not be implemented quickly and efficiently.

That’s what one children’s hospital thought. They were linked to a University Hospital System and treated many children who required urgent access to top specialist medical care. So they rolled out CPOE.

And then, the children died.

In the words of Han and coauthors:

Univariate analysis revealed that mortality rate significantly increased from 2.80% (39 of 1394) before CPOE implementation to 6.57% (36 of 548) after CPOE implementation. Multivariate analysis revealed that CPOE remained independently associated with increased odds of mortality (odds ratio: 3.28; 95% confidence interval: 1.94–5.55) after adjustment for other mortality covariables.“ (from the abstract)

The authors looked at the data first. They surveyed all children who were transferred to their hospital’s Intensive Care Unit from other hospitals within a time span of 18 months, 12 before and 6 after CPOE introduction. Then, they looked for the reasons.

These children were a special case. They needed the correct treatment, fast. Over the years, the hospital ICU team had evolved procedures that enabled them to be as fast as possible. They were as finely tuned as the team changing the wheels on a Formula 1 racing car.

The new system destroyed these processes, because it was slow. Before, doctors would pass quick written notes to nurses, who were always on the lookout for new instructions. Now, it took up to ten clicks to enter a medication order. Low bandwidth then added another delay until the order was transmitted to the pharmacists. Before, everybody was free to help tend to the patient, if needed. Now, one member of staff had to be at the computer, tending to the CPOE system. Before, staff could just grab what they needed to stabilise the patient. Now, everything went through central ordering.

With hindsight, it is easy to criticise the hospital team for what seems to be a rushed introduction of a system that was not ready for prime time. But if you look at the hype surrounding much of telehealth and telemedicine (“Act now! We know it works! You OWE it to your PATIENTS! (And to the taxpayers …)“), it is easy to see how this might have happened.

You will often hear telemedicine and eHealth evangelists say that the world could be so much better and brighter if it weren’t for those pesky practitioners who are clinging on to the old way of doing things.

In this case, the old way of getting medication to very sick children on arrival in the hospital ICU was actually working very well. Speed, and having as many hands as possible on deck, were essential.

The new way, with its ten clicks to achieve a single order, was more suitable for a situation where prescriptions were not urgent, where safety was paramount, and where there was spare personnel to focus on data entry.

In short, the new way was not usable.

Usability is far more than “do people like it?”. At the very minimum, per ISO 9241 definition, a usable system has to do what it is designed to do (effectiveness), and it has to do so with an appropriate speed (efficiency). If the users like it, that’s nice (user satisfaction), but it’s far from the whole story.

The key point where the CPOE system that Han and colleagues describe fell down was efficiency, which made it unsuitable for the task.

In theory, CPOE is a great idea, but it has to be usable in practice. Otherwise, it just won’t work.

ResearchBlogging.org Han, Y. et al. (2005). Unexpected Increased Mortality After Implementation of a Commercially Sold Computerized Physician Order Entry System PEDIATRICS, 116 (6), 1506-1512 DOI: 10.1542/peds.2005-1287

May 16, 2015

So, What is Psy Like as a Keynote Speaker?

Posted in Uncategorized tagged at 7:56 pm by mariawolters

At the recent CHI 2015 conference on Human-Computer Interaction in the heart of Gangnam District, Seoul, South Korea, we had a somewhat unexpected keynote speaker: Park Jae-Sang, also known as Psy, probably most famous for a certain song called Gangnam Style.

Why did I say Park Jae-Sang spoke? Because that’s who came. No glasses, no kooky clothes, no props, no silly dance. Just a man in a business suit and a microphone.

Park Jae-Sang is an ambitious man who is very conscious of the image he projects. At the same time, he tries to be himself. His constant jokes about his weight made it clear that he chose to stay his chubby self, despite K-Pop pressures to be slender and beautiful. His constant jokes about his English (which was excellent) showed his insistence on his Korean roots.

The tale he told was not of a Social Media Ninja, but of a shrewd business man whose associates told him about this YouTube thing – they convinced him, so he decided to explore it.

Then, he explored fame, and what it means to have a global hit. He concluded that Gangnam Style was a one-off, and the way forward for him is to be who he is – Park Jae-Sang, composer, businessman, artist, Korean, uniquely himself.

싸이.