May 17, 2015

The Craft of Usable eHealth

Posted in research tagged , , , at 6:19 pm by mariawolters

On the surface, usability is simple. “If the user can’t use it, then it doesn’t work at all”, as Susan Dray likes to say. But what does that mean in practice?

In health care, you have a large number of patients, a very small, finite number of health care practitioners, the cost of looking after these patients and providing them with the medications and therapy they need, and an empty purse.

And the demand for care is growing ever stronger. Thanks to the wonders of modern medicine, prevention, sanitation, and vaccinations, more people live longer, more people survive illnesses that would have otherwise killed them, and more people survive lifestyle choices that would have killed or crippled them fifty years ago.

eHealth promises to help. When the demand for skilled labour far outstrips its availability, technology can close the gap.

But eHealth technology will only work if people use it, and people will only use it if it works for them.

What does it mean for an eHealth system to be usable? In this post, I want to look at a somewhat iconoclastic discussion of the term usability by Gilbert Cockton, because it questions what I believe to be a dangerous myth in eHealth advocacy, the myth that people are the biggest barrier to successful implementation of telehealth.

They are not a barrier – they are the key.

Cockton summarises the standard view of usability thus:

  1. “Usability is an inherent measurable property of all interactive digital technologies

  2. Human-Computer Interaction researchers and Interaction Design professionals have developed evaluation methods that determine whether or not an interactive system or device is usable.

  3. Where a system or device is usable, usability evaluation methods also determine the extent of its usability, through the use of robust, objective and reliable metrics

  4. Evaluation methods and metrics are thoroughly documented in the Human-Computer Interaction research and practitioner literature. People wishing to develop expertise in usability measurement and evaluation can read about these methods, learn how to apply them, and become proficient in determining whether or not an interactive system or device is usable, and if so, to what extent.”

Vendors of eHealth systems who subscribe to this definition of usability will therefore (ideally) do the following:

A. Define a set of metrics that characterises the usability of their system

B. Conduct studies with all people who will use the system using appropriate methods in order to establish the usability of their system in terms of the specified metrics

The problem is that this is only the beginning. eHealth systems are used by people in specific contexts. Many of these contexts have features that cannot be foreseen by the original developers. People will adapt their use of those systems to the context and their own needs, a process that is known as appropriation in Human Computer Interaction.

Take for example a videoconferencing system that links people with their health care providers from the comfort of their own homes. The system has passed all objective and subjective metrics with flying colours, is easy to use, and has a mobile version, but requires a fast broadband connection.

User Jane McHipster lives on the waterfront in a loft with high ceilings. She has excellent broadband, so her GP can always see her clearly, but the sound is another matter. When the conversation turns to Jane’s mental health, the GP can barely hear her properly. But Jane is too ill to leave her house and come to the practice.

User June McHuckster, on the other hand, lives on a remote croft. Her Internet access comes through her smartphone contract, with the only provider who has good coverage of her home village. Her GPs used to call her regularly, but switched to the video system so they could see her, too. The picture quality is bad, and conversations often stop and start. June is so frustrated with the system that she will often tell the GP she’s fine just to cut the conversation short. This also leaves more of June’s limited broadband capacity for Skyping with her family, who live thousands of miles away.

Jim McSweeney is June’s next door neighbour. He also has family a thousand miles away, and the same smartphone contract. He has the same issues with conversations stopping and restarting, but for him, they don’t matter. He enjoys the banter with his GP when the connection breaks down yet again, loves being able to show instead of having to tell, and thanks the system for saving him from many a long and boring trip to the GP surgery.

*** *** ***

After thorough discussion of the literature on usability and usability evaluation, Cockton concludes in Section 15.5.3 that

  1. There are fundamental differences on the nature of usability, i.e., it is either an inherent property of interactive systems, or an emergent property of usage. There is no single definitive answer to what usability ‘is’. […]

  2. There are no universal measures of usability, and no fixed thresholds above or below which all interactive systems are or are not usable. […]

  3. Usability work is too complex and project-specific to admit generalisable methods. What are called ‘methods’ are more realistically ‘approaches’ that provide loose sets of resources that need to be adapted and configured on a project by project basis.”

Jane, June, and Jim have shown how usability emerges from the context in which the system is being used. In Jane’s case, the system works fine, but there are unexpected difficulties due to her living space. In June’s case, the system is hard to use, and it’s not worth it for her. In Jim’s case, the system is his salvation.

But if there is no one clear usability metric, then what are practitioners to do?

The first step is to genuinely listen to people’s concerns. Next steps and solutions will again vary by context.

For example, Jane could order a headset online, which would make her much easier to understand. June could shut off the video component of the consultation software, which consumes bandwidth and leads to most crashes, and only switch it back on again if the GP really needs to see her.

No rarely means never – in most cases, it means not specifically this, not right now, not right here. It is up to us to decipher it, and to design the interaction between human and eHealth system so we can get from no to yes.

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