August 9, 2015

Making the Most of ICPhS: Finding Interesting Papers

Posted in icphs tagged , , , at 1:26 pm by mariawolters

The 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS) is easily the largest yet, with over 770 oral and poster presentations, if we count the plenaries as well. All of those papers were accepted based on a full, four-page paper that represents a substantial piece of completed work and can be 1500-2500 words long, as long as a brief communication in a journal. This is very different from conferences in medicine, psychology, or the life sciences, where authors merely submit a 300-word abstract.

So, how can you as authors ensure that their papers are seen and heard?

In a sense, you have already completed the most important steps, which are to choose appropriate subject areas, create a good title and write a suitable abstract for your paper. The PDF version of the abstract book is easy to search, and we would like to encourage all attendees to use the search function liberally.

Remember that many criteria were used to create sessions: Not all ultrasound papers are grouped together, not all papers that deal with voice onset time are in the same sessions, and not all papers that address bilingualism are in dedicated bilingualism sessions.

If you are on social media (or know somebody who is on social media), we would like to encourage you or your colleague / friend / marketing accomplice to tweet your paper and session. For example, if you paper is an ultrasound study of consonants that involve a complete break in airflow (stop consonants) in people who are fluent in two languages (bilingual), you may want to tweet:

stop #articulation in #Korean/English #bilingual speakers – #ultrasound study. Alsh 1, 11am, Tues. #icphs2015

Finally, if somebody really should have been at your paper, and wanted to be at your paper, but missed it – they have the contact email of the corresponding right next to your abstract in the abstract book.

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